Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Cranberry Meatballs

These were tasty.  Could have easily used more kraut.  Cabbage for the win!

Large bag frozen meatballs
1 bottle chili sauce
1 bottle of water
1.5 c fresh cranberries
16oz sauerkraut - but add more!
1 c. brown sugar - did we use this much??

Cook it all day in the crock pot.

Served it with roasted potatoes.

Thursday, December 15, 2016

Cauliflower Rice With Tilapia

Made some cauliflower rice with Tilapia.  Simple and easy.

Sunday, December 11, 2016

Chili & Cranberry Cornbread

Standard beef chili. Made cranberry cornbread to go with it. Followed a nytimes recipe sorta. One cup cranberries with quarter cup powdered sugar. Tasty. Plenty sweet.

Saturday, December 10, 2016

Chorizo Tacos

Extra yum. Red onion a la chorizo salad. Cotija, salsas. Yum.

Carne tacos

Carne from la carniceria. Yum.

Wednesday, December 7, 2016



We basically followed the recipe below.  Used the big FYIPA-sized mason jar.  It didn't really work to keep something on the cabbage to keep it submerged though.  We did add caraway seeds, and cut it off after about 3 days.

1 medium head green cabbage (about 3 pounds)
1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt
1 tablespoons caraway seeds (optional, for flavor)

Cutting board
Chef's knife
Mixing bowl
2-quart wide-mouth canning jar (or two-quart mason jars)
Canning funnel (optional)
Smaller jelly jar that fits inside the larger mason jar
Clean stones, marbles, or other weights for weighing the jelly jar
Cloth for covering the jar
Rubber band or twine for securing the cloth

Clean everything: When fermenting anything, it's best to give the good, beneficial bacteria every chance of succeeding by starting off with as clean an environment as possible. Make sure your mason jar and jelly jar are washed and rinsed of all soap residue. You'll be using your hands to massage the salt into the cabbage, so give those a good wash, too.

Slice the cabbage: Discard the wilted, limp outer leaves of the cabbage. Cut the cabbage into quarters and trim out the core. Slice each quarter down its length, making 8 wedges. Slice each wedge crosswise into very thin ribbons.

Combine the cabbage and salt: Transfer the cabbage to a big mixing bowl and sprinkle the salt over top. Begin working the salt into the cabbage by massaging and squeezing the cabbage with your hands. At first it might not seem like enough salt, but gradually the cabbage will become watery and limp — more like coleslaw than raw cabbage. This will take 5 to 10 minutes. If you'd like to flavor your sauerkraut with caraway seeds, mix them in now.

Pack the cabbage into the jar: Grab handfuls of the cabbage and pack them into the canning jar. If you have a canning funnel, this will make the job easier. Every so often, tamp down the cabbage in the jar with your fist. Pour any liquid released by the cabbage while you were massaging it into the jar. Optional: Place one of the larger outer leaves of the cabbage over the surface of the sliced cabbage. This will help keep the cabbage submerged in its liquid.

Weigh the cabbage down: Once all the cabbage is packed into the mason jar, slip the smaller jelly jar into the mouth of the jar and weigh it down with clean stones or marbles. This will help keep the cabbage weighed down, and eventually, submerged beneath its liquid.

Cover the jar: Cover the mouth of the mason jar with a cloth and secure it with a rubber band or twine. This allows air to flow in and out of the jar, but prevents dust or insects from getting into the jar.

Press the cabbage every few hours: Over the next 24 hours, press down on the cabbage every so often with the jelly jar. As the cabbage releases its liquid, it will become more limp and compact and the liquid will rise over the top of the cabbage.

Add extra liquid, if needed: If after 24 hours, the liquid has not risen above the cabbage, dissolve 1 teaspoon of salt in 1 cup of water and add enough to submerge the cabbage.

Ferment the cabbage for 3 to 10 days: As it's fermenting, keep the sauerkraut away from direct sunlight and at a cool room temperature — ideally 65°F to 75°F. Check it daily and press it down if the cabbage is floating above the liquid.

Because this is a small batch of sauerkraut, it will ferment more quickly than larger batches. Start tasting it after 3 days — when the sauerkraut tastes good to you, remove the weight, screw on the cap, and refrigerate. You can also allow the sauerkraut to continue fermenting for 10 days or even longer. There's no hard-and-fast rule for when the sauerkraut is "done" — go by how it tastes.

While it's fermenting, you may see bubbles coming through the cabbage, foam on the top, or white scum. These are all signs of a healthy, happy fermentation process. The scum can be skimmed off the top either during fermentation or before refrigerating. If you see any mold, skim it off immediately and make sure your cabbage is fully submerged; don't eat moldy parts close to the surface, but the rest of the sauerkraut is fine.

Store sauerkraut for several months: This sauerkraut is a fermented product so it will keep for at least two months and often longer if kept refrigerated. As long as it still tastes and smells good to eat, it will be. If you like, you can transfer the sauerkraut to a smaller container for longer storage.

Recipe Notes

Sauerkraut with other cabbages: Red cabbage, napa cabbage, and other cabbages all make great sauerkraut. Make individual batches or mix them up for a multi-colored sauerkraut!

Canning sauerkraut: You can process sauerkraut for longer storage outside of refrigeration, but the canning process will kill the good bacterias produced by the fermentation process. See this tutorial from the National Center for Home Food Preservation for canning instructions.

Larger or smaller batches: To make larger or smaller batches of sauerkraut, keep same ratio of cabbage to salt and adjust the size of the container. Smaller batches will ferment more quickly and larger batches will take longer.

Hot and cold temperatures: Do everything you can to store sauerkraut at a cool room temperature. At high temperatures, the sauerkraut can sometimes become unappetizingly mushy or go bad. Low temperatures (above freezing) are fine, but fermentation will proceed more slowly.

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Acorn Squash with Kale and Sausage


Turned out pretty good.  Kids didn't like it that much, but was good otherwise.  We did quite a few (smaller) acorn squash.


2 medium acorn squash, halved down the middle, seeds removed
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Olive oil cooking spray
3 teaspoons olive oil, divided
8 ounces hot Italian turkey sausage, casings removed
1 large leek, white and light green parts only, halved and sliced
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
4 cups tightly packed torn kale
1/3 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth
1/4 cup chopped walnuts
2 tablespoons grated fresh Parmesan
2 tablespoons panko breadcrumbs


Heat oven to 375°.

Cut a thin slice off round side of each squash half to create a stable base. Sprinkle with salt and pepper; coat with cooking spray. Place squash flesh side down on a baking sheet lined with aluminum foil; bake until golden and tender, 30 minutes. Remove from oven; flip squash and set aside.

Heat broiler.

In a large nonstick skillet over medium heat, heat 1 teaspoon oil.

Add sausage; cook, breaking into coarse pieces, until brown, 6 minutes; transfer to a bowl.

To same skillet, add remaining 2 teaspoons oil and leek; cook until leek is soft, 3 minutes. Add garlic; cook, 30 seconds. Add kale and toss; add broth. Cover and cook until kale is tender, 5 minutes; stir in sausage.

Divide kale-sausage filling among squash.

In a bowl, combine walnuts, Parmesan and panko; sprinkle evenly over squash bowls and coat with cooking spray.

Broil until panko is golden, 2 minutes.

Monday, December 5, 2016

Chicken Noodle Soup

Made the crock pot stock last night.  Sauteed some carrots, celery, onion, threw in some chicken plus veg from last night, cooked some noodles on the side.


Sunday, December 4, 2016

Proper Roast Chicken Sunday Feast

Roasted a while chicken according to Jamie Oliver's Sunday feast directions. Potatoes, parsnips and carrots were delicious. Beets needed more time. Yorkshire pudding was fab.

Thursday, December 1, 2016

Roasted Veg Kale Pasta

Roasted some butternut squash (separately), plus beets, turnips, rutabaga, and kohlrabi.  Oil, salt, pepper and a bit of sage. Took 40 or so for the beets at 400. Caramelized an onion. Steamed some kale.

Mix it all together with some pasta water and butter. Not too shabby.